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Buick Forum: Some tips needed on buying a used Verano
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  1. #1
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    Some tips needed on buying a used Verano

    Hi there,
    I'm heading out tomorrow for the long drive to check out a 2016 Verano Leather that I'm very interested in. It's with a very large and reputable dealer, not some hole in the wall place, but even still I want to do my due diligence and try to check out the car as thoroughly as possible when I go down there. Anything in particular I should look out for with the car - all vehicles have their weak points? It has about 25,000 miles on it, so not too much wear and tear - I hope. Most that I can see from the pictures is a few paint chips that I'm hoping I can match up with an appropriately colored pen kit. If I could I'd try and arrange for a mechanic to look at it for me, but it's right out of my area.

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
    Skylarkin' is offline Sustaining Member My Buick(s): 2015 Buick Verano Turbo
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    Re: Some tips needed on buying a used Verano

    Hi Stephen,

    When I bought my Verano a little more than a year ago, I asked the dealer to make sure all of the applicable Technical Service Bulletins (TSBs) and any firmware updates for the engine and transmission were done before I signed the paperwork and took the car home. Do you know if the car has maintenance records for its previous 25K miles and if so, have you reviewed them to make sure the car had regular oil changes, the cabin air filter was changed regularly, etc? I had the 2.4L motor in my previous car, a Saturn Ion, and the Ecotecs are stout engines provided they're regularly serviced. If you have the car's VIN, plug it in here to see if any recalls are applicable - https://www.nhtsa.gov/recalls

    The only "flaw" these Delta platform sedans have is tight rear quarters compared to other cars in the same class. The upside of that is a gigantic (relatively speaking) trunk. For me, a less-than-roomy rear seat was not a drawback. Others may have more knowledge about problem areas or sticking points. Good luck tomorrow!
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    My first car was a 1977 Buick Skylark. Daily driver is a 2015 Buick Verano Turbo. Optimistically eyeing a 2020 or 2021 Regal GS next, if they're still around.

  3. #3
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    Re: Some tips needed on buying a used Verano

    Hi there,
    Didn't see this before I made the trip south to buy the car - it's now sitting proudly in my driveway. Got a nice deal on it because it had sat on the dealer's lot for a while and they kept reducing the price from 16k down to 14k due to some kind of issue with getting taxed on depreciation once a vehicle has been on a lot for longer than 45 days. The salesman actually told me that after the sale, so he had no reason to lie about it. Only in Fort Lauderdale could a late model Verano sit unsold for so long at the asking price - it was the cheapest car on the used lot of a major Lexus dealer.

    The car is in immaculate condition, and I'd say the only thing I noticed on the way back was that when I tended to brake a little firmly to come to a complete stop I seemed to feel a solid kind of downshift in the transmission at the end, but not knowing the vehicle I'm not sure if that's just normal or perhaps an issue?

    As for the records, I did ask for them but the dealer said there was no sign of them from the previous owner, but they did claim that it looked well-maintained when they did their own inspection. Seemed like that to me as well when I looked at it. The dealer said they changed all the fluids and the air filter, plus it has new tires all round, though only the back two are the Continentals Buick puts on. The front tires are Dunlop 235/45R18's - make any difference to the road noise, because I know Buick claims the Continentals are designed to minimize it? As it's only a 2016 model and I intent keeping my own records I'm hoping that Buick won't be SOB's should any warranty issues come up. The updates I obviously knew nothing about because I hadn't read your post - should I take it to a Buick dealer to check?

    Also, you're right about the trunk! My wife and I went to the supermarket this morning and noted how much room there is there - it's like a cavern! Interestingly, when I got it home and actually looked in the trunk (never gave it a thought when I was picking it up) I found a package inside containing some kind of weather strip. The packet says 'D1SB Front Lower Air Dam' - what it's for I have no idea, or why it was in the back.

    One point. Is it true that if the battery dies on these cars you are toasted as far as trying to get in because of a lack of a manual lock? I mean, everyone screws up occasionally and lets a battery run down or something like that - the notion of having to break into your own car in order to try and jump start it seems kind of silly.

  4. #4
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    Re: Some tips needed on buying a used Verano

    sorry - duplicated the post!

  5. #5
    Skylarkin' is offline Sustaining Member My Buick(s): 2015 Buick Verano Turbo
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    Re: Some tips needed on buying a used Verano

    Hi Stephen,

    Congratulations on your purchase, I hope you enjoy it! I think the downshifting on deceleration is normal. This is my first car with an automatic since 1977 and I sometimes notice it downshifting as I come to a stop.

    I think tire noise is subjective, especially on Veranos since they're so quiet to begin with. I'm not happy with the OEM tires; I think they're a cost-cutting move and during my research before buying my car, I read many people claiming they blow out too easily. Maybe that's a suburban myth. It wouldn't hurt to take it to your local dealer to make sure all the TSBs and firmware updates have been applied but I'd only do it in conjunction with an oil change unless you encounter a no-start situation or some other major problem.

    What you found in the trunk probably belongs on/under the front bumper of your car. Perhaps the previous owner never wanted it attached because they had a steep driveway and the air dam would scrape the pavement or maybe the former owner broke the original and you have the replacement. I'd probably have the dealer attach it; it should have been done before you took delivery.

    I can't answer your final question; maybe someone else on here who has had a Verano longer can.

    Don't forget to post a picture or two when you are able and again, congratulations!

  6. #6
    KevinJ is offline Contributing Member My Buick(s): 2013 Verano Premium (2.0T, AT)
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    Re: Some tips needed on buying a used Verano

    Congrats on your Verano. I think you will really like your car.

    I purchased my 2013 in 2016 at a Toyota dealership. Same kind of thing, it had sat there for about 2 months and they kept lowering the price. It was well below Kelly, Edmunds, NADA, etc. The used car manager told me that the owner of the dealership did not like Non-Toyota vehicles on the lot of too long. I've heard over the years that you can sometimes get better used car deals when you buy a brand of car not offered/carried at the New Car Dealership.

    Also, when I bought mine the Dealership had ran a Car Fax and provided it with the car. It showed all the maintenance that had been done at the Buick Dealership where it had been originally purchased. Besides the typical oil changes and a couple of tire rotations, it also showed windshield wiper replacement, and a front tire replacement due to damage from a pot hole. This had occurred right before the Car had been traded in at the Toyota dealer. The Toyota dealership then replaced the other 3 tires at their expense, so the car would have 4 brand new tires. The car only had 27,000 miles. Even the tire replacement done by the Toyota dealership showed up on the Car Fax. The new tires are all OEM Continentals.

    I've also read that the OEM Continental tires may be prone to blow out. Not sure I buy it... I think it's more of an issue with low-profile tires in general coupled with improper tire pressure being maintained. Also, I think the "Distracted Driving Syndrome" I witness on a daily basis has people hitting pot-holes and road hazards that probably could have been avoided if they had been paying attention. I bet tire and wheel damage in general has increased since the advent of Cell Phones and all the other Electronic Gadgetry Distractions now found in today's cars.

    I've rambled on for too long.

    Enjoy your ride and welcome to the forum!!

  7. #7
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    Re: Some tips needed on buying a used Verano

    Hey guys. Thanks for all that feedback. Firs time I read it was tonight - I'm sure I set this thing up to update me via email whenever someone responds but I'm not seeing them!

    Loving the Verano - can't believe that Buick discontinued such a nice car, though of course it worked in our favor regarding resale value. It's the leather version, and the smell of those seats alone is worth getting into the car each day! We ended up getting it for 13.5 k because we found that the dealer had slipped in a charge of $895 for GAP insurance that hadn't been discussed with us, and when we threatened to kick up a stink about it they took it out and took $500 off the price of the car to make the problem go away - even gave us a reduced interest from 3.9 to 2.74 to sweeten the deal. I hate dealing with car salesman, they just never change!

    Had the car for over a week now and just enjoy the hell out of the car - I keep finding technical reasons to go out and play with it in our driveway just so I can sit in it!

    Had two small glitches come up with it that had me taking it to the nearest Buick dealership this morning. Firstly, a few days ago we were driving along when the car started sending out a message (with an annoying beeping every so often) stating that we needed to have the airbags checked. The other thing I noticed was that the second key we were given didn't work. So in the car went today and back came the following news 1) they have to order in some kind of module for the airbag system that controls the passenger side (it's apparently something to do with the sensor that tells the car if someone's in the seat or not) and 2) The 2nd key is after-market and apparently hasn't been programmed - or programmed correctly - and it would cost $143 to have it done there. I also asked them to give the car a good inspection while there and they said it was in excellent condition, no issues at all other than the technical problem I brought it in on. The guy I spoke to also confirmed what's been said here, that the down-shifting I noticed is quite normal for the 6-speed gearbox on the car.

    So basically we're very happy with our purchase and just enjoy the heck out of cruising around in this car. Maybe it's a sign of my increasing years (I'm 58) but I really like the styling on the car and that lovely grill on the front - gives it some style! I was joking with my wife that in another ten years I'll probably be craving a Cadillac at the rate I'm going!

    One thing I'm surprised about is that I fully expected the car to be a little lacking in the juice department after reading numerous reports on how underpowered it is. Sure it's not the turbo version, but with 180 horses under the hood it's not exactly a dog either. I drove it back 200 miles from the dealership on the Florida turnpike and thought it was perfectly fine both for highway cruising and overtaking - I think you'd have to be a bit of a leadfoot to have issues with it. And the turning circle on it's great.

    Two questions - can I get the 2nd key programmed somewhere else at a cheaper price - dealerships always seem to charge premium prices for stuff like that? Do some of the better key-cutting specialists offer a service like that? Also, on the panel above the driver where the switches for the lights are three small square buttons, closer to the driver than the light switches - what are they for? I looked through the manual and can't seem to find anything. I played around with them to see if I could figure it out but nothing seemed to happen - I was hoping for ejector seats or rockets!

  8. #8
    Skylarkin' is offline Sustaining Member My Buick(s): 2015 Buick Verano Turbo
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    Re: Some tips needed on buying a used Verano

    Hey Stephen,

    Those button you refer to - are the in the overhead center portion of the interior roof? They may be dummy controls for the sunroof if you don't have a sunroof on your car. I admit I don't look above my head much in my car; I've become quite used to the blue lights beaming on me at night and I don't have a sunroof in my car.

    Regarding the 2.4L engine's power, or lack thereof, first you have to remember to enthusiasts and speed-freaks, no four-cylinder, turbocharged or not will ever be fast enough. These folks are absolute believers in the phrase, "There's no substitute for cubic inches!"

    It also depends on what you wanted and what you're used to. If you traded out of a Ford Fiesta or a Chevy Spark, the base Verano will certainly seem peppier and have plenty of oomph for regular driving. If you dropped down from Buick LaCrosse or a car with a V-8, the sub-Turbo versions of the Verano may seem a bit tepid. I wanted the turbo and was willing to sacrifice MPGs to get the extra power.

    However, a crucial difference between our cars and the first-generation Chevy Cruze is that they did not share engines. I think many who don't know different believe the Cruze and Verano are exact copies of each other except for the badging and lettering. Those who believe it's just more of the General's badge-engineering "magic" at work think the Verano is as slow or slower than the Cruze.

    You also have 171 lbs-ft of torque working for you. The old (it debuted in 2006 on the Chevy Cobalt and Saturn Ion) 2.4L made a decent amount of power in its final application. I just wish (one of many mid-cycle enhancement wishes I had) Buick had upgraded to the 2.5L engine before the car went out of production; it made just shy of 200 hp, so it wouldn't have upstaged the Turbo model.

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    Re: Some tips needed on buying a used Verano

    No, no sunroof, though I thought long and hard about getting a Verano with one. It's just that in central Florida I figure half the time it'll either be too hot to use one, or raining torrentially! Kind of odd that they would leave a set of mystery buttons behind that have no use.

    My two previous vehicles that I'm essentially merging into one with the Verano are a Dodge conversion van with the bigger V8 engine and for day to day use a PT Cruiser. The van, after many years of faithful service, recently got sold off and the PT cruiser will soon be gone as well now that the Verano is in the stable. One minor appeal for the Verano is that it has a 1000 lb towing ability, which I'll need to replace part of the hauling ability of the van. We have a ride-on mower that I take from our house to a couple of properties we own nearby so I needed something that could take the small trailer and mower along (both weigh 900lb together so well under the limit) . Kind of strange actually that the Verano has that towing ability but not the Regal, which is the bigger and more powerful car normally. The LaCrosse is also rated for 1000lb. I was really tempted by the turbo model, and there was one actually available nearby at about the same price, but it was a couple of years older and had a carfax report showing prior damage to both the back and the front in separate accidents. Liked it a lot, but given my lack of mechanical knowledge I just wasn't prepared to bite on a car with that kind of background, and with two years already down on the warranty.

    As I said earlier, I can't believe that they discontinued the model, but I guess that's the way it goes. Great car from what I've seen so far and feels and looks like a larger sedan. I know the knock on it is that it doesn't have much leg room in the back, but as it's usually just me and my wife it's not a big deal and the huge amount of space in the trunk is much handier.

  10. #10
    Skylarkin' is offline Sustaining Member My Buick(s): 2015 Buick Verano Turbo
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    Re: Some tips needed on buying a used Verano

    Since you need to tow, be glad you passed on the Turbo model. It's not recommended to tow anything. I think it has something to do with the transmission fitted to the Turbo, which is slightly different from your car's six-speed. There's another thread about how the turbo won't tow elsewhere on the board. I checked my car tonight and it has the buttons you mention in yours but I didn't notice that they did anything when I pressed them - no holographic torpedoes launched or fake phasers fired. Enjoy your car and make sure to come back if you have questions/issues.

  11. #11
    KevinJ is offline Contributing Member My Buick(s): 2013 Verano Premium (2.0T, AT)
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    Re: Some tips needed on buying a used Verano

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    The three buttons on the overhead console are the "Universal Remote System".
    You can program them for functions such as opening a garage door, arming or disarming alarm systems, etc.
    In the 2016 Owner Manual (2nd printing), it is explained in the following sections:
    "In Brief", page 21
    "Instruments and Controls", page 129

    You also mentioned that you have a new Key Fob that the car needs to be programmed for.
    Google "Programming Buick Verano Key Fob"
    They are some instructions out on the web and maybe YouTube.
    I read through one that was pretty lengthy and it looked like a MAJOR PITA.....
    Let us know if you decide to attempt it yourself or decide to let the dealer do it.
    Last edited by KevinJ; October 25th, 2017 at 01:19 PM. Reason: Typo...

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