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First snow, observations and questions

D2R

Active member
263
63
28
Michigan
Buick Ownership
2019 Regal TourX Essence
We don't have the Luxury of automatic HVAC, we plebes have to manually set controls to adjust our HVAC systems. You know, they're talking about rich people problems.
GM has strangely added it standard across all trim levels for the 2020 TourX.
Usually they tend to de-content their vehicle throughout the vehicle's life cycle.
 

garbageguy

Active member
181
96
28
Buick Ownership
Regal TourX 2019
Wagonlover, thanks for your input. Enjoy hearing from other TourX'ers. Agree about snow packing in wells. Expect it in wheels too.
I have often thought about Volvo's, but the $$...
 

TurboLover

Full Member
466
36
28
Central NJ
Buick Ownership
2011 Regal Turbo (T03) - 6 sp manual & 2013 Verano Turbo (totalled 9/19)
Gentlemen, use your AC for the fogging issue.
It might make no sense to you, but you'll be surprised. I have climate control set to 70, as soon as I get fogging, I'll run an AC to get rid of it.
I have this argument - I mean discussion - with my wife several times each winter. She turns the A/C off and wonders why the car keeps fogging. I tell her the A/C acts as a dehumidifier and disregard the idea of cooling, it still heats if you set the temp appropriately. Just will not accept in spite of evidence when I change the settings. I still love her though. LOL :)
 

PrincipalDan

Well-known member
442
347
63
Gallup, NM
Buick Ownership
2018 Regal TourX
I have this argument - I mean discussion - with my wife several times each winter. She turns the A/C off and wonders why the car keeps fogging. I tell her the A/C acts as a dehumidifier and disregard the idea of cooling, it still heats if you set the temp appropriately. Just will not accept in spite of evidence when I change the settings. I still love her though. LOL :)
I learned that pretty early with my old A-body Chevy Celebrity and then taught it to my slightly younger cousin when driving his Mom's old Toyota Trecel coupe.
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Uniqez

Active member
196
51
28
Buick Ownership
2018 Regal TourX Essence
I have this argument - I mean discussion - with my wife several times each winter. She turns the A/C off and wonders why the car keeps fogging. I tell her the A/C acts as a dehumidifier and disregard the idea of cooling, it still heats if you set the temp appropriately. Just will not accept in spite of evidence when I change the settings. I still love her though. LOL :)
Ya, they call it air conditioner for a reason. My wife were resistant too, until she saw magic happened and fogging dissapeared)))
 

garbageguy

Active member
181
96
28
Buick Ownership
Regal TourX 2019
I hope someone can put up info on how the TourX keeps the covers over LED lights from freezing over. (I do understand "AC")
 

Rhetoric

SUPPORTING MEMBER
746
536
93
MPLS
Buick Ownership
Red Needle TourX
My first post but have been visiting the forum for a couple weeks now and enjoy finding other TourX enthusiasts. I live in north central Minnesota and took delivery of my Essence model in late September of 2018.
We experienced a snowy last winter in Minnesota and I was impressed with how my TourX handled in the snow. As good as the Volvo V70 AWD it replaced. My only nitpicks are the tight clearance in the wheel wells causing snow, slush and ice to buildup and also the fact that snow gets packed in the factory wheels. Otherwise I’m very satisfied with the performance.
What part of North Central MN? I get up in that area every so often to see family.
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CTMechE

Active member
153
80
28
CT
Buick Ownership
'19 Regal TourX, Essence
I learned that pretty early with my old A-body Chevy Celebrity and then taught it to my slightly younger cousin when driving his Mom's old Toyota Trecel coupe.
All the GM cars I drove in the '90s (which were my parents' cars) would automatically turn the A/C compressor on when you turned on the windshield defroster. My father was in the HVAC business, and noted that in addition to the smarter design, GM air conditioning systems would often last longer because they didn't sit dormant for half the year when they automatically kicked on. (Freon almost always has lubricating oil in it, so letting a system sit for long periods allows seals to dry out and can lead to loss of refrigerant)
I noticed my Honda S2000 (manual climate controls) will automatically turn on the A/C as well if you select the windshield defrost.

I have a '19 Essence so I haven't paid much attention to the system, and have not had fogging problems. But if it's like my other cars with automatic climate control, the A/C compressor is almost always running regardless of season.
 

PrincipalDan

Well-known member
442
347
63
Gallup, NM
Buick Ownership
2018 Regal TourX
All the GM cars I drove in the '90s (which were my parents' cars) would automatically turn the A/C compressor on when you turned on the windshield defroster. My father was in the HVAC business, and noted that in addition to the smarter design, GM air conditioning systems would often last longer because they didn't sit dormant for half the year when they automatically kicked on. (Freon almost always has lubricating oil in it, so letting a system sit for long periods allows seals to dry out and can lead to loss of refrigerant)
I noticed my Honda S2000 (manual climate controls) will automatically turn on the A/C as well if you select the windshield defrost.

I have a '19 Essence so I haven't paid much attention to the system, and have not had fogging problems. But if it's like my other cars with automatic climate control, the A/C compressor is almost always running regardless of season.
I came out of a meeting last evening and had to manually engage the AC and windshield defrost to clear the fog.
 

CTMechE

Active member
153
80
28
CT
Buick Ownership
'19 Regal TourX, Essence
I came out of a meeting last evening and had to manually engage the AC and windshield defrost to clear the fog.
That stinks. Seems like one of many small things that used to be normal and now are being forgotten about.
______________________________
 

garbageguy

Active member
181
96
28
Buick Ownership
Regal TourX 2019
All the GM cars I drove in the '90s (which were my parents' cars) would automatically turn the A/C compressor on when you turned on the windshield defroster. My father was in the HVAC business, and noted that in addition to the smarter design, GM air conditioning systems would often last longer because they didn't sit dormant for half the year when they automatically kicked on. (Freon almost always has lubricating oil in it, so letting a system sit for long periods allows seals to dry out and can lead to loss of refrigerant)
I noticed my Honda S2000 (manual climate controls) will automatically turn on the A/C as well if you select the windshield defrost.

I have a '19 Essence so I haven't paid much attention to the system, and have not had fogging problems. But if it's like my other cars with automatic climate control, the A/C compressor is almost always running regardless of season.
I remember that all too well. So glad it now lets me decide if the compressor runs, no matter where or how the air is discharged. My recollection is that non-american cars had that before. Sounds like I better run the compressor to keep the inside windows clear - but what about those LED's and how do they melt snow/ice?
 

mike69440

Well-known member
918
500
93
Buick Ownership
2018 TourX Essence
Ice today not snow.

TourX sort of behaved like it was RWD, not that that's bad, and I started to wonder if it had Anti lock brakes?
 

Pacer69

Sustaining Member
399
193
43
KC
Buick Ownership
TourX
Mine doesn't like ice - haven't met a car yet that does unless it has special tires/chains etc.

Last season it was great in frequent 6-8" snows, the best AWD system I've experienced outside of my wife's '03 Suzuki XL-7 which really isn't fair as that was a dedicated "switch into 4WD system" vs full-time AWD. That XL-7 was a pretty solid workhorse for the money, although it started having issues at close to 100k miles so we sold it. Will be interesting to see how my TourX does with 12k miles on it in the same stuff.
 

Artyldr01

Member
42
46
18
Buick Ownership
2018 Regal TourX
Today was my first real use of the TourX in snow/sleet/slush/ice conditions here in the Twin Cities as well. My vehicle of reference is my 2013 Silverado I traded in and my older 2004 Mazda 6s Wagon I used to have.

I will say, the weight and 4WD in the truck make it much less susceptible to slushy lane changes, and curves. My TourX is definitely less "planted."

I haven't figured out how the AWD is supposed to work, does it apply traction differently depending on traction/slippage? The rear did have a tendency to want to come around in curves. I did see the traction control light flash when losing grip, but I also wondered if I would see the "green gear" that illuminates in hard cornering on dry pavement.

I will also say, the best tires I ever had were the Continental DWS (Dry Wet Snow) on my Mazda 6s wagon. It felt great in ALL conditions. When the factory Continentals wear out, I'm definitely getting them again.

Anyway, my $.02 so far.
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PrincipalDan

Well-known member
442
347
63
Gallup, NM
Buick Ownership
2018 Regal TourX
Today was my first real use of the TourX in snow/sleet/slush/ice conditions here in the Twin Cities as well. My vehicle of reference is my 2013 Silverado I traded in and my older 2004 Mazda 6s Wagon I used to have.

I will say, the weight and 4WD in the truck make it much less susceptible to slushy lane changes, and curves. My TourX is definitely less "planted."

I haven't figured out how the AWD is supposed to work, does it apply traction differently depending on traction/slippage? The rear did have a tendency to want to come around in curves. I did see the traction control light flash when losing grip, but I also wondered if I would see the "green gear" that illuminates in hard cornering on dry pavement.

I will also say, the best tires I ever had were the Continental DWS (Dry Wet Snow) on my Mazda 6s wagon. It felt great in ALL conditions. When the factory Continentals wear out, I'm definitely getting them again.

Anyway, my $.02 so far.
Good to know oversteer is the default - I prefer it honestly. Although I noticed that tendency on a cloverleaf where one side was wetter than the other.

I'm irritated by being unable to find details about the % torque split front/rear from our AWD system and the maximum amount that can be sent to either end by the system.

For my Highlander the specs were easy to find.
 

Artyldr01

Member
42
46
18
Buick Ownership
2018 Regal TourX
Good to know oversteer is the default - I prefer it honestly. Although I noticed that tendency on a cloverleaf where one side was wetter than the other.

I'm irritated by being unable to find details about the % torque split front/rear from our AWD system and the maximum amount that can be sent to either end by the system.

For my Highlander the specs were easy to find.
It seems like almost ANY useful information is hard to find.
 

PrincipalDan

Well-known member
442
347
63
Gallup, NM
Buick Ownership
2018 Regal TourX
OK still doesn't tell me, I checked all those links and all it did was make me jealous of Europe getting a selector switch for yaw control.

I'll give you an example or 2. My 2010 Highlander had a system that Toyota referred to as 4wd because the default torque split was 50/50 - the system had the ability to send nearly all of the torque to one end of the vehicle or the other in low speed conditions to help get unstuck, the system would use the brakes to brake ONE wheel if it was excessively slipping and send that power to the wheel on the other end of the axle if it had more grip.

Subaru has their info largely out there. Their manual transmission vehicles are 50/50 and their auto/CVT vehicles are 60/40 with 60 percent of the power sent to the front end (I'd be really impressed if it was 60 percent to the rear as a default.)

Driving impressions so far (9000 miles) have me feeling that the default is likely 50/50, the car feels very neutral in most situations. I don't feel like it's pulling me along or pushing me along (I've owned FWD, RWD, and 4wd/AWD vehicles). When driven hard through the corners and the little green gear lights up to show that vectoring is happening it feels like the system is also pushing a little extra torque to the rear vs the front (40/60?) and the car starts to almost feel RWD - pushed hard in a slick situation it will get a little tail happy.

But what is the system capable of? That's what driving me nuts. Can it do 90/10 or 10/90 when needed to get out of a snowbank?

I'm sure I'll run into a sticky situation here in the Mountain West here at some point this winter. On Thanksgiving Day here in Gallup the ground/pavement was dry but at my sister-in-law's house in Peralta, NM they got about 4-6 inches and that was our Thanksgiving destination. There were times when things felt more squirrely than I anticipated but I suspected that it was a tire issue and not a system issue. It was low speed situations like an unplowed driveway.
 
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