Has anyone replace their Tourx wheels?

Thread starter #1

DasWagen

New member
10
2
3
Buick Ownership
2018 Tour x
I'm not a fan of the factory wheels. Thanks for all the options, GM. I'm thinking about the wheels below. According to the manufacture's web site they fit. I can't determine how wide the factory wheels are. Anyone know? Other ideas? Thanks.

tsw.JPG
 
Thread starter #4

DasWagen

New member
10
2
3
Buick Ownership
2018 Tour x
I've been researching a bit. It looks like the Lacrosse wheels are the same size/bolt pattern/offset. Kinda liking these.
1543975896503.png

Also this Verano wheel is the same but the offset is 46 not 40mm. I'm guessing 6mm would be noticable? I like the Verano better.
1543976040672.png
______________________________
 
Thread starter #8
10
2
3
Buick Ownership
2018 Tour x
Looking at some 20" Lacrosse wheels. The wheels are larger but the sidewall is less so the total extra diameter is only +.4". I understand the Buick ride height was raised a half an inch so there should be room in the wheel well. Will this affect any of the stability/TC electronics?
Capture.JPG
______________________________
 
81
31
18
MPLS
Buick Ownership
2018 TourX
Looking at some 20" Lacrosse wheels. The wheels are larger but the sidewall is less so the total extra diameter is only +.4". I understand the Buick ride height was raised a half an inch so there should be room in the wheel well. Will this affect any of the stability/TC electronics?
View attachment 12956
It shouldn’t as long as all four wheels are identical in diameter. My winter setup is 0.1” different with no ill effects.
 
81
31
18
MPLS
Buick Ownership
2018 TourX
No, anti-lock, stability, traction control are all non-issues.

Look at the weight, though. Plus-sizing rims usually means dramatically more weight.
You sound like my TDI-brethren looking for maximum fuel economy by being conscious of rotational mass. ;)

Joking aside this is a valid point. Even these alloys get quite heavy, and the tires too.
 
175
38
28
Humboldt County, CA; or Germany
Buick Ownership
Not yet...
You sound like my TDI-brethren looking for maximum fuel economy by being conscious of rotational mass. ;)

Joking aside this is a valid point. Even these alloys get quite heavy, and the tires too.
Nevermind the rotational mass... Think of the unsprung weight.

People usually assume that bigger wheels/shorter tires ride badly because there's not enough sidewall compliance, but a lot of that is the greater unsprung weight.

See here: https://www.caranddriver.com/features/effects-of-upsized-wheels-and-tires-tested
______________________________
 
24
10
3
Buick Ownership
2018 TourX Essence
Nevermind the rotational mass... Think of the unsprung weight.

People usually assume that bigger wheels/shorter tires ride badly because there's not enough sidewall compliance, but a lot of that is the greater unsprung weight.

See here: https://www.caranddriver.com/features/effects-of-upsized-wheels-and-tires-tested
The baddest wagons I ever owned were all three of the 149 1991 Audi 200 Turbo Quattro Wagons that were imported into the US. Only available with 5 speeds and loaded (for their day) with the only choices being exterior and interior color and "Sport" or "Comfort" seats in the front. Car and Driver said that if Lamborghini made a wagon, this would be it. Audi was still recovering in the US at the time and these came in at a cool $41K in 1991. There just wasn't a lot of demand for speedy wagons with sticks, turbos, and sodium filled valves at over $40g's at the time (about $77K adjusted for 2018). One unique feature were the ultra light 15 inch BBS factory wheels which were there to reduce unsprung weight but that also carried a "comfortable" sidewall for that "Oh so lovely ride." In order to get sufficient braking the calipers were installed around the center of the brake rotors which were "affectionately" known as UFO's for their odd looking design. Unfortunately, if you can find them, a set of these rotors (two) will run you a cool grand or more and parts for these cars are so hard to find I finally gave up my last 200TQW a couple of months ago. Here's a quick tutorial on some automotive history.... and a photo of my last one, not a bad looking rig for a 27 year old car. It would pull sub 15 sec quarter miles at my local drag strip on street nights without even beating on it, although it was chipped (chip by a company called "Intended Acceleration" ;-) ) Also, as an aside, a used set of these rotors make an excellent mooring for a 17' Glastron in fresh water. (link below photo) SIZED-7159.jpg https://www.quattroworld.com/audi-news/audis-world-ufo-brakes-worked-also-kinda-didnt/
 
Last edited:
81
31
18
MPLS
Buick Ownership
2018 TourX
The baddest wagons I ever owned were all three of the 149 1991 Audi 200 Turbo Quattro Wagons that were imported into the US. Only available with 5 speeds and with loaded (for their day) with the only choices being exterior and interior color and "Sport" or "Comfort" seats in the front. Car and Driver said that if Lamborghini made a wagon, this would be it. One unique feature were the ultra light 15 inch BBS factory wheels which were there to reduce unsprung weight. In order to get sufficient braking the calipers were installed around the center of the brake rotors which were "affectionately" known as UFO's for their odd looking design. Unfortunately, if you can find them, a set of these rotors (two) will run you a cool grand or more and parts for these cars are so hard to find I finally gave up my last 200TQW a couple of months ago. Here's a quick tutorial on some automotive history.... and a photo of my last one, not a bad looking rig for a 27 year old car. It would pull sub 15 sec quarter miles at my local drag strip on street nights without even beating on it, although it was chipped. (link below photo) View attachment 12971 https://www.quattroworld.com/audi-news/audis-world-ufo-brakes-worked-also-kinda-didnt/
I still drool over these. So good.
 
Thread starter #16
10
2
3
Buick Ownership
2018 Tour x
Nevermind the rotational mass... Think of the unsprung weight.

People usually assume that bigger wheels/shorter tires ride badly because there's not enough sidewall compliance, but a lot of that is the greater unsprung weight.

See here: https://www.caranddriver.com/features/effects-of-upsized-wheels-and-tires-tested
Interesting article. Too bad C&D didn't post the weights of each to see the change as you increase, or how performance was affected. Curious how the ride/handling sweet spot was 2" to 3" bigger than stock. Although a 15" wheel is rather small by today's standards.
______________________________
 
Your email address will not be publicly visible. We will only use it to contact you to confirm your post.
Top