High mileage oil - worth it?

stoopid

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#2
I'm sure there's a chart somewhere peddled by the oil maker that shows the 1.56% gains from using such oils, but it's highly doubtful that they would result in any actual real world improvement in change interval or engine longevity. Regarding longevity, decisions made 100,000+ miles ago likely predetermined that.

If truly concerned, change the oil and filter more often. But if it's not broke, you probably don't need to fix it.
 

PurpleHaze

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#4
My 2006 CX mileage is getting up there 186,000 Km. Anyone try any high-mileage engine oils? Are they worth it? BL
I use Valvoline high mileage synthetic 5w-30 oil in my 2014 Buick Lacrosse and in my 2006 Cadillac Escalade. My Lacrosse has 43k miles and my Cadillac has about 213k miles. The oil has both of my engines running smooth, however I have not compared the high mileage oil against a normal synthetic oil so I can not say for sure if the high mileage formula is working as advertised. What I can say is that Valvoline high mileage synthetic oil keeps my engines running smooth and strong even my 213k mile engine, so I guess the extra additives work. My Cadillac engine do not even smoke or burn oil so the piston rings are clean at least so the high mileage oil seem to be working well in that regard.
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Rick341

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#5
My 2006 CX mileage is getting up there 186,000 Km. Anyone try any high-mileage engine oils? Are they worth it? BL
High mileage oils normally cost a bit more than standard oil and the additional cost may not be justified on lower mileage cars but could be well worth it on higher mileage vehicles especially if your vehicle smokes or drips oil in your driveway. High mileage oils claim to have additional additives (and there's no reason to believe they don't) that will condition older gaskets and seals and extend the life of the engine. Seal conditioners, extra anti-wear additives as well as additional dispersants and detergents found in high mileage oils help restore seals, break up any sludge and keep the internal engine parts clean. I tend to use it when my vehicles reach 100,000 miles. Just for peace of mind if nothing else.
 

stoopid

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#6
High mileage oils normally cost a bit more than standard oil and the additional cost may not be justified on lower mileage cars but could be well worth it on higher mileage vehicles especially if your vehicle smokes or drips oil in your driveway. High mileage oils claim to have additional additives (and there's no reason to believe they don't) that will condition older gaskets and seals and extend the life of the engine. Seal conditioners, extra anti-wear additives as well as additional dispersants and detergents found in high mileage oils help restore seals, break up any sludge and keep the internal engine parts clean. I tend to use it when my vehicles reach 100,000 miles. Just for peace of mind if nothing else.
By the sounds of it, we should be using high mileage oil from day one if it's that beneficial(?).
 

PurpleHaze

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#7
By the sounds of it, we should be using high mileage oil from day one if it's that beneficial(?).
You hit it on the nose. Valvoline states that new cars can benefit from the high mileage oil as well as older cars. It seems that is it better to use the high mileage oil before the engine has seal issues than to use it when the seals are already worn. I believe that high mileage oils are a good preventive measure to use, hence why I use the oil on younger engines like my Lacrosse with only 43k miles to keep my seals conditioned and internals clean.
 

stoopid

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#8
There's also oil treatments you can add periodically that are supposed to accomplish the same thing. The jury is out though on whether any of it actually matters. The only information available is what's provided by the makers of the (snake) oil.
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DonP

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#9
Probably not worth it in a new car, if it was a good idea they would not call it "high mileage." The thicker properties migth even be unhelpful in a new, tight engine. It probably helps an older car with a "loose" engine and worn seals in terms of reduced oil consumption and somewhat better lubrication in areas with a bit of mechanical wear that has resulted in larger than normal clearances.
 

PurpleHaze

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#10
Probably not worth it in a new car, if it was a good idea they would not call it "high mileage." The thicker properties migth even be unhelpful in a new, tight engine. It probably helps an older car with a "loose" engine and worn seals in terms of reduced oil consumption and somewhat better lubrication in areas with a bit of mechanical wear that has resulted in larger than normal clearances.
The oil weight of 5w-30 is still the same in a high mileage formula, so the oil is not thicker than a normal 5w-30 weight oil. High mileage oils just have more detergents and seal conditioners that firm up seals, hence the extra cost over standard oil.

Valvoline states on its website that high mileage oil use can benefit new engines as well as old engines, however older engines would probably benefit the most due to having worn seals and more contaminants in the engine than a new engine; so the affects of using a high mileage oil are actually seen when old engines reduce oil consumption when using high mileage oil; new engines usually do not have any oil seal related issues so the affect of using high mileage oil will not be seen.


However, using a high mileage oil before the engine seals go bad or the engine becomes too dirty is a good proactive measure in my opinion to prevent the seals from going bad and excessive contaminants to build up in the first place.

https://www.valvoline.com/our-products/motor-oil/full-synthetic-max-life
 
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stoopid

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#11
The oil weight of 5w-30 is still the same in a high mileage formula, so the oil is not thicker than a normal 5w-30 weight oil. High mileage oils just have more detergents and seal conditioners that firm up seals, hence the extra cost over standard oil.

Valvoline states on its website that high mileage oil use can benefit new engines as well as old engines, however older engines would probably benefit the most due to having worn seals and more contaminants in the engine than a new engine; so the affects of using a high mileage oil are actually seen when old engines reduce oil consumption when using high mileage oil; new engines usually do not have any oil seal related issues so the affect of using high mileage oil will not be seen.

However, using a high mileage oil before the engine seals go bad or the engine becomes too dirty is a good proactive measure in my opinion to prevent the seals from going bad and excessive contaminants to build up in the first place.
Explained that way it actually makes sense.
 

PurpleHaze

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#12
There's also oil treatments you can add periodically that are supposed to accomplish the same thing. The jury is out though on whether any of it actually matters. The only information available is what's provided by the makers of the (snake) oil.
So true. Unless some one actually breaks down various engines after so many miles to compare the effectiveness of the claims then it is all just speculation about if any additional oil treatment and/or special oil works or not. Some people claim high mileage oil and treatments slow down an oil leak, while just as many owners claim that neither works to control oil consumption in their cars.

I use Valvoline high mileage synthetic due to it being very good Dexos certified oil with additives that "should" work in theory to keep my engines clean and runs well without leaks. So far so good on my Cadillac Escalade with 213k miles. The engine feels good and does not burn oil so I based my opinion on how it runs in my older engine. I "assume" that is helping my 3.6 V6 in my Lacrosse runs smooth as well.

Other than that I have no other proof of the effectiveness of using high mileage oil, but I like the results so far.
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stoopid

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#13
I use Valvoline high mileage synthetic due to it being very good Dexos certified oil with additives that "should" work in theory to keep my engines clean and runs well without leaks. So far so good on my Cadillac Escalade with 213k miles. The engine feels good and does not burn oil so I based my opinion on how it runs in my older engine. I "assume" that is helping my 3.6 V6 in my Lacrosse runs smooth as well.

Other than that I have no other proof of the effectiveness of using high mileage oil, but I like the results so far.
That's the problem with anecdotal evidence - it's not verifiable or replicable. Same reason people develop superstitions. They touch the picture frame every day because they have their whole life and haven't died, with the idea if they continue to do that they will never die because as long as they have touched the picture they haven't died. :p

"Broncos always win when I wear this shirt"

"I've been using this oil my whole life and have never had an engine die on me."

Etc.

Makes for good brand loyalty and sales, but not very scientific.
 

PurpleHaze

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#14
That's the problem with anecdotal evidence - it's not verifiable or replicable. Same reason people develop superstitions. They touch the picture frame every day because they have their whole life and haven't died, with the idea if they continue to do that they will never die because as long as they have touched the picture they haven't died. :p

"Broncos always win when I wear this shirt"

"I've been using this oil my whole life and have never had an engine die on me."

Etc.

Makes for good brand loyalty and sales, but not very scientific.
Well, we have to use a reference point somewhere. I personally do not break down engines to check to see if they are clean internally or not, so I just rate a product due to its results. Not a perfect scientific method, but it works for me. If I have used a certain brand/type of oil for some time and the engine runs good with it, then to me it is a good product to use. I will always pay a bit more for a proven product in my eyes than take a risk by cheapening out on oil just because some else thinks a cheaper product would do the same job due to only skepticism.

Neither opinions are scientifically proven, yet I would take my chances with the product listed to do the job and appears to do so than change products with unknown results.

Note: Using a specific product that gives favorable results it was designed to provide is not the same as thinking wearing a specific article of clothing with a logo will impact the results of a game due to "supernatural" properties like increased luck for the favored team.:)
 
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stoopid

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#16
There are a ton of comparisons on oil brands done by independent labs all over the WWW. Amzoil and Pennzoil are on top in most of them. https://www.yourbestpicks.com/best-synthetic-motor-oils/#Pennzoil Ultra Platinum Full Synthetic Motor Oil. :headbang:
There aren't any(?) comparisons of high mileage oils, at least nothing the last time I looked the other day. Or any studies regarding the benefits of high mileage oils. Mobile did do a study for their 20,000 mile "annual protection" oil, but that's not the oil being discussed here.
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DonP

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#19
A wise mechanic once told me that nothing poured out of a can is going to fix a mechanical problem; e.g., worn seals. It may just hide the problem for a while. That said hiding a problem for a while may be the right answer for a car you are going to unload in the near future. By the same token burning more oil may be lower net cost over the remaining ownership of a vehicle than paying for an overhaul.

https://bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php/forum_summary is a good site for discussions about motor oils.

I believe the thing about high mileage oils is that old, worn engines need more additives (detergents, seal conditioners, friction modifiers, viscosity improvers, etc.) to make it between recommended oil change intervals (OCI). With a newer engine regular oil retains the needed properties for the full OCI, but a worn engine it may not. Symptoms that indicate one may benefit from a high mileage oil can include smoke, increased oil use, oil leaks, and of course the results of oil tests.

Bottom line is do what makes you feel comfortable.
 

ClayBelt

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#20
I use generic, regular oil from whatever parts store I go to. Usually whatever is 5qts and a filter for $20. Only thing I do is change the Oil and Filter every 3000 miles (5000km). I have made it to 227k miles on the stock engine that way, and near as I can tell none of the previous owners had any fancy Oil in the car. Only additive used was Marvel when I first got it so as to loosen up any crud in the system, ended having to replace a leaky valve cover Gasket for that reason.
 
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