How hot does your Verano Turbo get?

KevinJ

Contributing Member
120
14
18
Location
Ohio
Buick Ownership
2013 Verano Premium (2.0T, AT)
Thread starter #1
Hey guys, just curious...
What Temp does your Turbo Verano run at.
Mine seems to run around 190 - 195 on the Temp gauge.

And maybe more importantly, how hot does it get under the hood?

If I open my hood while the car is at a normal operating temperature, most everything under the hood is so hot it can't be touched or barely touched at all. In fact, the car is so hot, the hood latch itself can barely be touched to even open the hood.
Actually, if I am opening the hood while it is hot, I use a rag to protect my hand from the heat.

Anybody, else notice this with their cars?
 

MelsRegal

Full Member
1,865
68
48
Buick Ownership
Regal GS 2017
#2
The vehicle has a 195 degree thermostat so an engine that is warmed up will have a range of about 195 to 225. How long have you had the car?
Any usual noises indicating an exhaust leak?
 

KevinJ

Contributing Member
120
14
18
Location
Ohio
Buick Ownership
2013 Verano Premium (2.0T, AT)
Thread starter #3
I've owned the car since Sept 2016.
Have had zero problems. No exhaust leaks. No error codes or indicators. Runs fine.
Temp Gauge is reading normal at around 195. I've only seen it go above 200 when running the car hard.

It just get's really hot under the hood.
For people that are not "automotivally inclined" and never open a hood, they would never know the difference.

Was just wondering if this was normal.
I figure it's the Turbo causing the "extra" heat.

Do any of you guys with Turbos let your car idle for 2 or 3 minutes before shutting it off to "cool" down the Turbo?
I know that this is generally recommended in the "tuner" world, and used to be recommend during the early adoption of turbo-chargers by the manufacturers. Not sure about now, and I could find nothing in the owners manual recommending this.
 
354
75
28
Location
S.W. Ontario Canada
Buick Ownership
2018 Regal Sportback - 2010 Yamaha R6 (track bike) Past cars: 92 LeSabre, 98 Regal, 02 GrandPrixGT
#4
My Regal with the LTG 2.0 turbo gets super hot under the hood.

This is normal. It might seem excessive heat to someone who never drove/owned a turbo 4-banger. But turbos make TONS of heat and there is no way around it.
______________________________
 

Skylarkin'

Sustaining Member
Sustaining Member
135
15
18
Location
St. Louis, Missouri
Buick Ownership
2015 Buick Verano Turbo
#5
Kevin, you're right - the turbo thoroughly heats most of the engine bay, and very efficiently as you describe - it's normal. I, too, use a pair of gloves when I need to open the hood right after a drive or I wait 'til later, especially this time of year.

I thought adding an intercooler negated letting the engine idle for a few minutes to "cool" down the turbo and that intercoolers solved the "oil coking" phenomenon so common on turbocharged engines in the 80s but I could be conflating things in my memory.
 
354
75
28
Location
S.W. Ontario Canada
Buick Ownership
2018 Regal Sportback - 2010 Yamaha R6 (track bike) Past cars: 92 LeSabre, 98 Regal, 02 GrandPrixGT
#6
Oil cooking is when you run the engine hard, come to a stop and shut off the engine. All turbo engines will cook the oil this way.

After running the engine HARD, we have to idle the car for a couple minutes to let the oil flow and cool down a little through the turbo.

Oil cooking is not a problem when driving normally.
 

KevinJ

Contributing Member
120
14
18
Location
Ohio
Buick Ownership
2013 Verano Premium (2.0T, AT)
Thread starter #7
Hey guys, thanks for the confirmation on the heat.

I was guessing (hoping) that this was normal and probably due to the turbo.
But wow does it get hot under there.
I'm surprised that the heat doesn't kill the battery in short order.
My 2013 with 35,000 miles still has it's original battery which so far seems good.

Just out of curiosity, I may have to pick up a thermal/infrared temperature gun just to see how hot some of those temperatures are.

I did go out and did a little "googling" on turbos, and found some reliable info. put out by Garrett.
And Zero is correct, generally speaking a cool down period is not needed under normal driving conditions.
I also read that these turbos get much hotter that 1000F and that 1500F-1600F is not unusual when driven hard.

So, yeah... it's gonna get hot under there.
 

Skylarkin'

Sustaining Member
Sustaining Member
135
15
18
Location
St. Louis, Missouri
Buick Ownership
2015 Buick Verano Turbo
#8
Engine heat is one reason I wish GM kept the battery in the trunk on the Delta cars, as it was in my Ions. Granted, I had to buy a special, vented battery but I never worried about engine heat shortening battery life, there was a ground in the engine bay for jumpstarting and the battery's absence left a big chunk of space in the engine bay.
______________________________
 

KevinJ

Contributing Member
120
14
18
Location
Ohio
Buick Ownership
2013 Verano Premium (2.0T, AT)
Thread starter #9
A battery in the rear of the car has always made more sense to me.
Both from a heat standpoint and weight distribution.

Most people don't realize that summer heat kills the battery, but it doesn't drop over dead until winter when that cold engine and thick oil needs those cranking amps to turn over.

My 1997 Buick Riviera actually had the battery located under the right rear passenger seat.
Traded the car off in 2003 with a little over 100,000 miles and it still had it's original battery.
 
Your email address will not be publicly visible. We will only use it to contact you to confirm your post.
Top