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How Rare?

stembridge

Active member
106
113
43
Buick Ownership
2018 Buick Regal TourX Essence
I would have bought an AWD Impala in a heartbeat. Or Malibu.
Actually was looking at AWD Ford Fusions but they just seemed too primitive.
We bought our TourX about a year before leaving snowy/icy Central IL and moving back South; the wife did fine for 18+ years with front-wheel-drive minivans, so AWD wasn't really a 'gotta have' for us. It was the styling, uniqueness and 30% discount that led to our purchase.

es
 

RegalMN

Active member
255
132
43
Minnesota
Buick Ownership
'18 Regal Sportback Essence
We bought our TourX about a year before leaving snowy/icy Central IL and moving back South; the wife did fine for 18+ years with front-wheel-drive minivans, so AWD wasn't really a 'gotta have' for us. It was the styling, uniqueness and 30% discount that led to our purchase.

es
I've survived 30 plus years (of driving) in Minnesota with mostly front drive, but now that AWD is more common it's a feature I will always choose to have on my cars/SUVs.
 
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adam728

Full Member
206
95
28
Buick Ownership
Buick
I hope someone is finally able to discover the total TourX units sold in the US - I'm guessing it's rarer than both my former SS (12,856 units sold) as well as my former Cosworth Vega (3,508 units sold).

I think the TourX sold much better than the Cosworth Vega (It's 1 Vega for the price of 2!).

Normal number tossed around is about 10,000 units. What I looked at back in February.

Using Autotrader this morning as a guesstimate:
179 fwd sportbacks
132 TourXs
18 awd sportbacks
15 GSs

Figuring the ~27K Regals sold in the US, that puts the weighted estimate at:
14,000 fwd sportbacks
10,000 TourXs
1400 awd sportbacks
1200 GSs

Seems believable. And one could argue the GS is more of an enthusiast car and gets held onto longer, meaning the estimate above could be low. I've seen a couple GS Regals, which is all I can say for the TourX as well. So 130 total just sounds far too low. Less than 3 per state?
Today looks like 152 Sportback's, 106 TourX's, and 8 GS's. That would make the shares around 15,400 Sportbacks (same as Feb), 10,700 TourX's, and 812 GS's.

I live in a small town and there are several TourX's here. I find it hard to belive there'd be <3,508 in the US.
 

ready2fly

Active member
257
97
28
Sarasota, Florida
Buick Ownership
2018 Regal Sportback Preferred II
I live in IL and even though we don’t get nearly as much snow as you do, I too like having the AWD on my TourX. I even have a set of snow tires from my Chevy Volt that I should be able to bolt right on. This car should be a beast in the snow.
I used to live in Wisconsin and I spent 2 years in Alaska for work. I had a brand new 2014 Acura RDX AWD in Alaska and I was slipping and sliding everywhere on my stock Michelin Primacy tires. Preserving the environment is uber important there, so roads in Alaska are plowed, but not salted. Driving on black ice everywhere is an everyday routine for 5 months out of the year. I was shocked seeing locals zipping through huge snow storms in Honda Civic or Toyota Corolla. It turned out everyone (around 95% of the population) puts on winter tires. Some even buy studded tires, which I think are also completely worthless (vs regular winter tires) unless you have to go off-road. So I decided to do the same thing, I bought a set of winter Hankooks and put them on. I then realized what a bunch of garbage is AWD. My car was planted, it went through ice and snow like a tractor. My supervisor drove a Honda Civic SI (it only comes in 6MT FWD) with winter tires on, it was as good as my RDX AWD on ice and snow.

Conclusion: if I ever move up north again I will be buying FWD or RWD car/crossover and a set of winter tires. A set of winter tires provides all of the benefits: winter tires are generally more fuel efficient vs AWD setup, they cost around $400 (+another $500 if you want a dedicated set of rims) while AWD costs $2-$3k, they provide way better traction and handling during the winter, they extend the life of your stock all-season set, they don't add weight vs AWD, they don't add extra system that may fail over time, winter tires need no maintenance AND the most important thing - they provide excellent braking on ice. I nearly rear-ended other people way too many times when I was in Alaska riding on all-season tires, but not even once when I got my winter tires installed.
AWD is absolutely useless. It is nothing but a marketing hype to me (except if you work in construction or live deep in the country with unpaved roads).
______________________________
 
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LLninja

Greenback Troll #1
705
176
43
Illini country, surrounded by bean fields
Buick Ownership
2018 Buick Regal TourX Essence
I used to live in Wisconsin and I spent 2 years in Alaska for work. I had a brand new 2014 Acura RDX AWD in Alaska and I was slipping and sliding everywhere on my stock Michelin Primacy tires. Preserving the environment is uber important there, so roads in Alaska are plowed, but not salted. Driving on black ice everywhere is an everyday routine for 5 months out of the year. I was shocked seeing locals zipping through huge snow storms in Honda Civic or Toyota Corolla. It turned out everyone (around 95% of the population) puts on winter tires. Some even buy studded tires, which I think are also completely worthless (vs regular winter tires) unless you have to go off-road. So I decided to do the same thing, I bought a set of winter Hankooks and put them on. I then realized what a bunch of garbage is AWD. My car was planted, it went through ice and snow like a tractor. My supervisor drove a Honda Civic SI (it only comes in 6MT FWD) with winter tires on, it was as good as my RDX AWD on ice and snow.

Conclusion: if I ever move up north again I will be buying FWD or RWD car/crossover and a set of winter tires. A set of winter tires provides all of the benefits: winter tires are generally more fuel efficient vs AWD setup, they cost around $400 (+another $500 if you want a dedicated set of rims) while AWD costs $2-$3k, they provide way better traction and handling during the winter, they extend the life of your stock all-season set, they don't add weight vs AWD, they don't add extra system that may fail over time, winter tires need no maintenance AND the most important thing - they provide excellent braking on ice. I nearly rear-ended other people way too many times when I was in Alaska riding on all-season tires, but not even once when I got my winter tires installed.
AWD is absolutely useless. It is nothing but a marketing hype to me (except if you work in construction or live deep in the country with unpaved roads).
I bought a set of snow tires to put in my factory rims on my volt then also bought custom rims for my next set of standard radials right after Snowageddon 2. The tires did their job, thwarting the arrival of snowageddon 3. I haven’t needed the snow tires other than maybe once or twice a year after any big snow storm. The tires probably have less than 1k miles on them. Alas, I know as soon as I sell them, I will get buried in snow and ice. I chalk it up to a nice $600 insurance policy, no different than the $600 tractor PTO generator I purchased which has thwarted all future lengthy power outages.
 

D2R

Well-known member
1,922
797
113
Michigan
Buick Ownership
2019 Regal TourX Essence
Nah, RWD with winter tires can still drift. Tried it already.
But it has to do with how the vehicle is driven. Drive like an idiot and it will drift.
I agree that the tire is more important than AWD. But combining the 2 is better than each individual ones on their own.
 

ready2fly

Active member
257
97
28
Sarasota, Florida
Buick Ownership
2018 Regal Sportback Preferred II
Nah, RWD with winter tires can still drift. Tried it already.
But it has to do with how the vehicle is driven. Drive like an idiot and it will drift.
I agree that the tire is more important than AWD. But combining the 2 is better than each individual ones on their own.
Being a careful driver helps. Location is also important. When I lived in Virginia I did not care about snow or ice. It would snow a few times every winter and the snow would melt within 1-2 days. It would stay in low 40's during the winter. But living in Michigan, Wisconsin or Minnesota is a very different story.
______________________________
 

liuby33

Active member
322
184
43
Buick Ownership
2018 Regal GS
3 years after the first models were driven off the factories, I still get the "wtf is that" face occasionally from pedestrians.
 

ZB Commodore Owner

Active member
141
72
28
Hamilton, New Zealand
Buick Ownership
2019 Holden ZB Commodore RSV Liftback 3.6 AWD
I used to live in Wisconsin and I spent 2 years in Alaska for work. I had a brand new 2014 Acura RDX AWD in Alaska and I was slipping and sliding everywhere on my stock Michelin Primacy tires. Preserving the environment is uber important there, so roads in Alaska are plowed, but not salted. Driving on black ice everywhere is an everyday routine for 5 months out of the year. I was shocked seeing locals zipping through huge snow storms in Honda Civic or Toyota Corolla. It turned out everyone (around 95% of the population) puts on winter tires. Some even buy studded tires, which I think are also completely worthless (vs regular winter tires) unless you have to go off-road. So I decided to do the same thing, I bought a set of winter Hankooks and put them on. I then realized what a bunch of garbage is AWD. My car was planted, it went through ice and snow like a tractor. My supervisor drove a Honda Civic SI (it only comes in 6MT FWD) with winter tires on, it was as good as my RDX AWD on ice and snow.

Conclusion: if I ever move up north again I will be buying FWD or RWD car/crossover and a set of winter tires. A set of winter tires provides all of the benefits: winter tires are generally more fuel efficient vs AWD setup, they cost around $400 (+another $500 if you want a dedicated set of rims) while AWD costs $2-$3k, they provide way better traction and handling during the winter, they extend the life of your stock all-season set, they don't add weight vs AWD, they don't add extra system that may fail over time, winter tires need no maintenance AND the most important thing - they provide excellent braking on ice. I nearly rear-ended other people way too many times when I was in Alaska riding on all-season tires, but not even once when I got my winter tires installed.
AWD is absolutely useless. It is nothing but a marketing hype to me (except if you work in construction or live deep in the country with unpaved roads).
There's AWD and there's AWD, they're not all the same. The Twinster AWD in the Regal GS and the TourX is vastly different and better than most other systems.

Here's an article that explains it along with the other systems on the car. 2018 Holden Commodore VXR - Technical Details Explained | Practical Motoring

Also here's a good video showing some of the differences between the system we have on our cars and other well known brands with AWD.
 

ready2fly

Active member
257
97
28
Sarasota, Florida
Buick Ownership
2018 Regal Sportback Preferred II
There's AWD and there's AWD, they're not all the same. The Twinster AWD in the Regal GS and the TourX is vastly different and better than most other systems.

Here's an article that explains it along with the other systems on the car. 2018 Holden Commodore VXR - Technical Details Explained | Practical Motoring

Also here's a good video showing some of the differences between the system we have on our cars and other well known brands with AWD.
Twinster AWD is much better than many other systems, I get it. That's was not my point though. AWD improves acceleration traction, nothing else. However, as I had learned the hard way, what truly matters is braking. When you start sliding on ice it makes zero difference AWD, FWD or RWD - you will rear end someone in front of you. AWD also makes zero difference when you try to climb an icy hill or an icy driveway - you will slip with all 4 wheels - I had it happen in Alaska and I almost hit someone behind me because I started sliding backwards trying to accelerate on an icy hill, I had all-season tires at that time. But FWD/winter tires combo is way way better for traction, braking, handling during the winter vs AWD with all-season tires. FWD with winter tires also provides other benefits as I had mentioned.
 

lLePunisherl

New member
16
10
3
Buick Ownership
Buick Regal gs 2019
Twinster AWD is much better than many other systems, I get it. That's was not my point though. AWD improves acceleration traction, nothing else. However, as I had learned the hard way, what truly matters is braking. When you start sliding on ice it makes zero difference AWD, FWD or RWD - you will rear end someone in front of you. AWD also makes zero difference when you try to climb an icy hill or an icy driveway - you will slip with all 4 wheels - I had it happen in Alaska and I almost hit someone behind me because I started sliding backwards trying to accelerate on an icy hill, I had all-season tires at that time. But FWD/winter tires combo is way way better for traction, braking, handling during the winter vs AWD with all-season tires. FWD with winter tires also provides other benefits as I had mentioned.
What about awd with great winter tire combo?
______________________________
 

ready2fly

Active member
257
97
28
Sarasota, Florida
Buick Ownership
2018 Regal Sportback Preferred II
Well, the 2008+ Regals were designed, developed and produced by Opel in Germany, so how much of a Buick is it, really?
It is an Opel, but Envision is designed and produced by SAIC in China, so is it not a Buick? My point is that most people never knew Buick Regal Sportback/TourX even existed to begin with.
 

ZB Commodore Owner

Active member
141
72
28
Hamilton, New Zealand
Buick Ownership
2019 Holden ZB Commodore RSV Liftback 3.6 AWD
Even better. But 95% of people will be way better off with FWD/winter tires vs AWD with all-season tires.
Surely AWD like on the Buick and winter tyres has to be better then either FWD or RWD and winter tyres. In other words with like for like tyres, the Twinster adaptive AWD will be better.
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LLninja

Greenback Troll #1
705
176
43
Illini country, surrounded by bean fields
Buick Ownership
2018 Buick Regal TourX Essence
AWD is better than 4WD which is better than FWD which is better than RWD (though some prefer a proper RWD when racing) for wintery traction

Winter tires are better than all season radials which are better than performance tires which are better than slicks for wintery traction.

For Baja Racing, track racing, or drag racing everything gets jumbled around.
 

Spudboy52

New member
6
18
3
Buick Ownership
Regal Tourx
I live in Northern Wisconsin and apparently have a behavioral problem regarding wagons. I have daughters in university on both coasts, … bought them matching Subaru Outback’s. I myself own a Tourx for long distance summer driving. Plus, I have two Volvo V70s, … putting snow tires on both for the winter, … different tools for different jobs. I’m concerned with the statements in this thread that only weirdos buy wagons!
 

2007LucerneCXL

Full Member
8,985
3,108
113
Illinois
Buick Ownership
2007 Lucerne CXL. and 1995 Lesabre currently, past 1973 Riviera, 1968 Riviera
Sorry but it's the driver that is the deciding factor. You can load a vehicle up with any number of features for weather conditions and if the driver is a idiot none will save them from having a incident.
 

aethelwulf

New member
4
3
3
I live in Maine and drove a RWD Magnum with studless snow tires for years with no issue. And my father in law is in the tire business and has stated studs are pretty pointless these days, but folks still buy them out of habit as they were sold hard 30+ years ago.

Plenty of folks manage fine in FWD and even RWD as long as they have snow tires. Plenty of AWD vehicles off the road in the winter because the owners cheaped out and ran all seasons. Had a Subaru Impreza in college and ended up buying snow tires for that after a few close calls without them.
 
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