Oil Change

Thread starter #1

TheAirman

Full Member
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8
18
Buick Ownership
2013 Encore Premium
I decided to add some pictures to the original DIY Oil Change thread because they seem to be missing. The original thread is here:
DIY Oil Change
It has lots of good information on doing the oil change. And it was one of the easiest oil changes I've done in a while, and you can do the whole job without spilling a drop. In some cars, the oil change can be very messy.

The drain plug. I could reach it from under the front of the car. No need to jack it up or use ramps. It's 10mm and the torque is 10 ft-lbs. And it is stamped in the pan in Newton Meters (14Nm).
100_2188.JPG

Don't forget to buy a rubber o-ring for the drain plug. It was not included in the filter kit, so I bought a couple at the dealer, but the local auto parts store claims they carry them also.

100_2187.JPG

I like to let my oil drain for a longer period of time than the dealer does, so in the meantime, I changed the filter. It's easy to get to and the cap on mine is made of plastic. It uses a 24 mm socket and its torque is 18 ft-lbs.

100_2192.JPG

Another view from the front of the car.

100_2193.JPG

My 24 mm socket is 1/2" drive, so it is real easy to apply to much torque to the plastic oil filter cap. Use caution. A 3 inch extension made it fit perfect.

100_2194.JPG

The old filter. It stays clipped into the cap, and you have to pull it out of the cap to change it.

100_2195.JPG

The inside of the filter assembly. I stuffed a paper towel down there before I removed the cap and you can see about the only drop of dirty oil that escaped. Nothing dripped off the filter when I removed it.

100_2196.JPG

The new filter and O-ring. The large O-ring came in the filter kit and it goes around the filter cap. Don't forget to replace that also. Just pry it off with a small straight slot screwdriver. I used a NAPA Gold filter (7674). Just push the filter back into the cap until it clicks and lock in place.
100_2197.JPG

Take off the fill cap. It is a quarter turn cap, and mine seemed to be stuck on and hard to remove. I had to wiggle a little and pull up.

100_2198.JPG

Unless you are a pro at pouring oil into the engine and not make a mess, you have to use a funnel. I used Mobil 1 5W-30. I usually get a 6 pack at Costco because it's the best deal. The manual states 4.2 quarts, but after I added 4 quarts, ran the engine to check for leaks, then checked the dipstick, it was right on the mark, so I didn't add the .2 quarts. I'll recheck it in a week or so.

100_2199.JPG

Don't forget to reset the oil life monitor back to 100%. And you are done!
 

Zeroboostbuick

Active member
971
210
43
S.W. Ontario Canada
Buick Ownership
2018 Regal Sportback - 2010 Yamaha R6 (track bike) Past cars: 92 LeSabre, 98 Regal, 02 GrandPrixGT
Thanks for the write up.

One think to point out... Buick states after the motor has been running, to let the motor sit at least 2 hours before getting a accurate oil level reading. It states the most accurate reading will be after the car sat over night.
 

KevinJ

Contributing Member
174
26
28
Ohio
Buick Ownership
2013 Verano Premium (2.0T, AT)
Excellent "How To" write up.

However!! One BIG CAUTION!!
The engine may require a different oil filter than the one indicated in the Owners Manual and by some of the aftermarket manufacturers. AND!!! The 2 filters ARE NOT interchangeable!!

2013-2018 Owners manuals are incorrect/incomplete.
2019 Owners manual was finally corrected.

OEM/AcDelco Part#'s:
PF2257G (for Hengst Oil Filter Housing - more commonly found with many aftermarket options)
PF2263G (for UFI Oil Filter Housing - less common with few aftermarket options)

Here is an extensive thread on the subject: Caution 2 different oi filters for Buick Encore
______________________________
 
Thread starter #5

TheAirman

Full Member
237
8
18
Buick Ownership
2013 Encore Premium
Thanks for the write up.

One think to point out... Buick states after the motor has been running, to let the motor sit at least 2 hours before getting a accurate oil level reading. It states the most accurate reading will be after the car sat over night.
My owners manual (2013) states:
"If the engine has been running recently, turn off the engine and allow several minutes for the oil to drain back into the oil pan.

2013_buick_encore_owners.pdf
 

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Thread starter #6

TheAirman

Full Member
237
8
18
Buick Ownership
2013 Encore Premium
Excellent "How To" write up.

However!! One BIG CAUTION!!
The engine may require a different oil filter than the one indicated in the Owners Manual and by some of the aftermarket manufacturers. AND!!! The 2 filters ARE NOT interchangeable!!

2013-2018 Owners manuals are incorrect/incomplete.
2019 Owners manual was finally corrected.

OEM/AcDelco Part#'s:
PF2257G (for Hengst Oil Filter Housing - more commonly found with many aftermarket options)
PF2263G (for UFI Oil Filter Housing - less common with few aftermarket options)

Here is an extensive thread on the subject: Caution 2 different oi filters for Buick Encore
It's good that you should say.

I have the Hengst cap and the filters for that cap vary in design also.

I had the factory filter from the dealer and it seemed cheaper in design than the one I bought at NAPA.

Here's the one I bought:
NAPA 7674

It had a updated relief valve plunger in the clip side. (The side that clips into the cap). The OEM filter was just a open hole. The NAPA filter also had a solid end cap, where the OEM filter had a felt type end cap.

The paper work included in the NAPA filter said:

"Several design differences are found on this product as compared to the OEM construction. The top cap has a relief valve plunger that helps the filter to better engage the housing by-pass valve. This filter also has skirted end caps to accommodate more sealing adhesive. This allows the filter media to be more firmly anchored into the end cap".

The bottom line is, this cheap little filter is confusing with it's different designs, plus with the mistakes in the manual.

The UFI cap uses a by-pass valve that has a spring. I'm not sure it will even fit in a Hengst cap.
Maybe it does. Who knows?

UFI Filter:
https://www.amazon.com/ACDelco-PF2263G-Professional-Engine-Filter/dp/B01FRF81G2

What ever happened with using a good old fashioned metal spin on filter?
 

KevinJ

Contributing Member
174
26
28
Ohio
Buick Ownership
2013 Verano Premium (2.0T, AT)
What ever happened with using a good old fashioned metal spin on filter?
Actually, cartridge filters are the original filter design that cars came with when invented and remained so until around 1950. On these early vehicles, the location and design of the cartridge and the housing make them messy and a general PITA to change. Also, the housing holding the cartridge also has to be thoroughly cleaned out.

In the 50's the manufacturers transitioned to the metal canister filter to "eliminate" that messy cleanup and for generally easier oil changes. I've heard some people claim that higher compression engines coming out in the 50's also dictated the design change, but I have found no real evidence this is true.

Fast forward to the 21st century and we find ourselves going back to the cartridge filter.
From what I've read over the last few years, this change was driven mainly to cut down on material and construction costs. No steel enclosure to fabricate and incorporate the filter media into.

Other reasons in going back to the cartridge filter, is ease of filter removal. A cartridge filter housing with an integrated hex-head cap nut is generally easier to remove than a canister filter. And when located and designed correctly, it is usually less messy with easier cleanup. And lastly, the auto-manufactures also want to standardize and trim down on the number of oil filters needed to service their vehicles.

My 2013 Verano and my brothers 2017 Encore, both with cartridge filters, are the 2 easiest and cleanest oil changes either us have ever had to do on any vehicle. And my brother has owned around 30 vehicle, from pre 1950 classics to his 2017 Encore.

With that being said, our Mother has a 2009 Toyota Sienna Minivan. It has a cartridge filter underneath the vehicle and is mounted like a traditional canister filter. It requires a housing specific filter cap wrench to remove the cartridge housing. It is a royal PITA and always causes a mess. The design and location is just BAD, not a fault of the filter cartridge, but of Toyota engineers.
______________________________
 
Last edited:
971
210
43
S.W. Ontario Canada
Buick Ownership
2018 Regal Sportback - 2010 Yamaha R6 (track bike) Past cars: 92 LeSabre, 98 Regal, 02 GrandPrixGT
My owners manual (2013) states:
"If the engine has been running recently, turn off the engine and allow several minutes for the oil to drain back into the oil pan.

2013_buick_encore_owners.pdf
I suppose it's the same idea. But the 2018+ Regal manual goes a bit farther. Here is exactly what it says in my manual...
--------------------------------------------------

If a low oil Driver Information Center
(DIC) message displays, check the
oil level.
Follow these guidelines:

To get an accurate reading, park
the vehicle on level ground.
Check the engine oil level after
the engine has been off for at
least two hours. Checking the
engine oil level on steep grades
or too soon after engine shutoff
can result in incorrect readings.
Accuracy improves when
checking a cold engine prior to
starting. Remove the dipstick
and check the level.
If unable to wait two hours, the
engine must be off for at least
15 minutes if the engine is
warm, or at least 30 minutes if
the engine is not warm. Pull out
the dipstick, wipe it with a clean
paper towel or cloth, then push it
back in all the way. Remove it
again, keeping the tip down, and
check the level.
 
Thread starter #10
237
8
18
Buick Ownership
2013 Encore Premium
Actually, cartridge filters are the original filter design that cars came with when invented and remained so until around 1950. On these early vehicles, the location and design of the cartridge and the housing make them messy and a general PITA to change. Also, the housing holding the cartridge also has to be thoroughly cleaned out.

In the 50's the manufacturers transitioned to the metal canister filter to "eliminate" that messy cleanup and for generally easier oil changes. I've heard some people claim that higher compression engines coming out in the 50's also dictated the design change, but I have found no real evidence this is true.

Fast forward to the 21st century and we find ourselves going back to the cartridge filter.
From what I've read over the last few years, this change was driven mainly to cut down on material and construction costs. No steel enclosure to fabricate and incorporate the filter media into.

Other reasons in going back to the cartridge filter, is ease of filter removal. A cartridge filter housing with an integrated hex-head cap nut is generally easier to remove than a canister filter. And when located and designed correctly, it is usually less messy with easier cleanup. And lastly, the auto-manufactures also want to standardize and trim down on the number of oil filters needed to service their vehicles.

My 2013 Verano and my brothers 2017 Encore, both with cartridge filters, are the 2 easiest and cleanest oil changes either us have ever had to do on any vehicle. And my brother has owned around 30 vehicle, from pre 1950 classics to his 2017 Encore.

With that being said, our Mother has a 2009 Toyota Sienna Minivan. It has a cartridge filter underneath the vehicle and is mounted like a traditional canister filter. It requires a housing specific filter cap wrench to remove the cartridge housing. It is a royal PITA and always causes a mess. The design and location is just BAD, not a fault of the filter cartridge, but of Toyota engineers.
Your Bro has me beat. At last count I was somewhere around 25 cars.

And you are exactly right. Some of my early cars had the cartridge filters in all the different locations. And some had the canister spin on type in the worst location, where you had to have the car up on ramps just to reach them. Then when you removed them, they would dribble down the side of the engine and make a mess for days.

I remember having to use the entire newspaper on the floor, have a roll of paper towels nearby, and still having a big mess to clean. Especially back when I used Arco Graphite oil. That stuff stained anything in touched.

But one of my other cars (Japanese brand with a boxer engine) has a canister spin on at the top of the engine and is absolutely the cleanest, easiest oil change ever. On the Encore, I got one drop on the paper towel and maybe a drop on the transmission. On my other car, not a single drop.
 

KevinJ

Contributing Member
174
26
28
Ohio
Buick Ownership
2013 Verano Premium (2.0T, AT)
Your Bro has me beat. At last count I was somewhere around 25 cars.
Yeah, my Brother is only 50, but he bought his first car at age 15, before he even had a license. It was a 70's something crapped out, 4 cylinder Mustang, that he paid $150 bucks for!!! I kid you not!!

Over the last few years he always has at least 2 and usually 3 or 4 cars at any given time.
One is always his everyday reliable driver. Currently the 2017 Encore. Which he does really like and will probably keep for at least a few years.

He also has an all original 1971 Monte Carlo. 65,000 or so miles. He's had it for several years and takes it to cruise-ins, car show's, etc. He's won several trophys with it.

He recently flipped a no rust, real clean, 1971 Impala Convertible with it's original 402 big block.
He bought it and a 1923 T-Bucket Roadster as a package deal.
Fixed a few mechanical things on the Impala and gave it good detailing. Had it for less than a year and made $4,000 on it.

He's working on the T-Bucket right now, it had not been ran for 20 years or so. It is a circa 1970 build. Has a warmed over small block Chevy, Edelbrock intake, Holley carb, etc. putting out 350 or so horses. Huge Mickey Thompsons mounted on Cragers on the rear, and narrow tires on the front, Medium Blue metal flake paint job. As pure a definition of hot-rod as you can get. I actually got to ride in this car back in the late 70's. It only weighs around 1500lbs and is scary fast.

Ok, enough about cars.... gotta' go... stuff to do.... :)
 
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